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April 21 2017

21:18
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summers-in-hollywood:

Alain Delon on the set of Plein Soleil, 1960

Reposted fromLittleJack LittleJack viaszydera szydera
Rekrut-K
21:18
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'serieus religieus'
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arconos:

milkattack:

when u think yr drawing looks great but then u flip the canvas

image

image

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tech-knowledge:

prostheticknowledge:

Google Earth’s Incredible 3D Imagery, Explained

Latest episode of Nat & Friends gives insight into making the contemporary Google Earth and its highly impressive capture of terrain (and arguably the highest profile example of computational photography):

Google Earth is the most photorealistic, digital version of our planet. But how?! Where do the images come from?  How are they they put together? And how often are they updated? In this video, learn about the pixels, planes, and people that create Google Earth’s 3D imagery. 

Link

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyhole_Markup_Language

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML notation for expressing geographic annotation and visualization within Internet-based, two-dimensional maps and three-dimensional Earth browsers. KML was developed for use with Google Earth, which was originally named Keyhole Earth Viewer. It was created by Keyhole, Inc, which was acquired by Google in 2004. KML became an international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium in 2008.[1][2] Google Earth was the first program able to view and graphically edit KML files. Other projects such as Marble have also started to develop KML support.[3]

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Rekrut-K
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jesus christ
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Rekrut-K
20:53
Play fullscreen
This is important
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We Just Breached the 410 Parts Per Million Threshold | Climate Central

The world just passed another round-numbered climate milestone. Scientists predicted it would happen this year and lo and behold, it has.

On Tuesday, the Mauna Loa Observatory recorded its first-ever carbon dioxide reading in excess of 410 parts per million (it was 410.28 ppm in case you want the full deal). Carbon dioxide hasn’t reached that height in millions of years. It’s a new atmosphere that humanity will have to contend with, one that’s trapping more heat and causing the climate to change at a quickening rate.
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Rekrut-K
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Science March Germany
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sigh.......
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Rekrut-K
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Hate is not inherent, hate is taught

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Rekrut-K
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